Tag Archives: Nicholas Kristof

Largest fast food walkout in U.S. history, Obama refuses to say “poor,” CR addresses Sir Don Lemon

Listen to the new episode of Citizen Radio and subscribe to the free podcast. Allison and Jamie discuss the largest fast food walkout in U.S. history, President Obama refusing to say “poor,” even at a time of growing income disparity, the train wreck appearance of Reza Aslan on Fox News, CNN host Don Lemon’s disappointing racist and homophobic statements, lawmakers protecting [...]

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Our Pigs, Our Food, Our Health

Nicholas Kristof The late Tom Anderson, the family doctor in this little farm town in northwestern Indiana, at first was puzzled, then frightened. He began seeing strange rashes on his patients, starting more than a year ago. They began as innocuous bumps — “pimples from hell,” he called them — and quickly became lesions as [...]

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Where Sweatshops Are a Dream

Allison Kilkenny 1 Reply

Nicholas Kristof PHNOM PENH, Cambodia Before Barack Obama and his team act on their talk about “labor standards,” I’d like to offer them a tour of the vast garbage dump here in Phnom Penh. This is a Dante-like vision of hell. It’s a mountain of festering refuse, a half-hour hike across, emitting clouds of smoke [...]

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Striking the Brothels’ Bottom Line

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Nicholas Kristof POIPET, Cambodia In trying to figure out how we can defeat sex trafficking, a starting point is to think like a brothel owner. My guide to that has been Sok Khorn, an amiable middle-aged woman who is a longtime brothel owner here in the wild Cambodian town of Poipet. I met her five [...]

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Obama’s ‘Secretary of Food’?

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Nicholas Kristof As Barack Obama ponders whom to pick as agriculture secretary, he should reframe the question. What he needs is actually a bold reformer in a position renamed “secretary of food.” A Department of Agriculture made sense 100 years ago when 35 percent of Americans engaged in farming. But today, fewer than 2 percent [...]

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